Chicago Tips and Recommendations from a Graduate Student

By Charmaine N. Willis

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This year marks my first year attending MPSA. I look forward to being able to share my research, to receive feedback, and to network with other scholars at one of the biggest and most well-known political science conferences. However, I would be remiss if I did not say that one of the biggest things that I am excited about in attending MPSA is returning to Chicago. Having been born and raised in rural New England, I have been to Chicago only one other time in my life but I quickly fell in love with the Windy City. It has all the trappings of any major city (a wide selection of food, drink, and things to do) while maintaining some semblance of a Midwestern charm. While my experience in Chicago is limited compared to some others’, I offer some recommendations to both graduate students and those attending MPSA for the first time.

First and foremost, check out Chicago-based Groupon for deals on food, drinks, entertainment, and other things to do. A recent glance at the site reveals over 1,200 deals for activities and over 1,200 on food and drink, respectively. Some deals offer especially deep discounts. Groupon is an important first consideration for graduate students and others on a tight budget as it can make partaking in some of Chicago’s signature activities and landmarks more realistic financially.

A second stop should be MPSA’s own Family Resources page. The page offers information for parents about resources available at the conference as well as family-friendly activities, including information on nearby parks, and dining options in Chicago. Additionally, the site lists discounts for local sporting events available to MPSA members and their family and friends. Conveniently, there is also a list of pharmacies and hospitals near the conference if needed.

One of the must-do activities that most visitors to Chicago will recommend is a river-boat architectural tour. Chicago boasts several distinct architectural styles throughout its buildings and having a knowledgeable tour guide to describe the history is imperative to understanding and appreciating them. The river-boat tours are particularly fun as one can relax and get perspectives of the buildings that one cannot get by walking or other types of tours. There are several companies that run river-boat tours, including a few by the Chicago Architectural Foundation. Those interested in going on an architectural tour should peruse Groupon for tour discounts.

Chicago, like many major cities, hosts several excellent museums. While I am not as much of a museum-lover as I wish I was, I really enjoyed visiting the Field Museum of Natural History. This museum has something for everyone including movies, hands-on activity centers, and, of course, exhibits (personal favorite is The Tsavo Lions– fascinating!) Fortunately, the museum is easily accessible by bus and fairly inexpensive for students even without a discount ($21 for basic admission).

Chicago is renowned for many things, not the least of which is its signature deep-dish pizza. Although I am an enthusiast of New York-style pizza, I was pleasantly surprised to discover how much I enjoyed Chicago-style pizza. A local Chicagoan recommended that I try the pizza at Lou Malnati’s, a Chicago chain pizzeria known for its deep-dish style. There are locations throughout the city and the prices are reasonable. This is a good option for those interested in trying deep-dish pizza and seeing what the fuss is all about.

Finally, for micro-brew aficionados, Chicago is home to Goose Island Beer Company. Their two locations in the city feature more than a dozen brews on tap in addition to their widely-available 312 Urban Wheat Ale. They also offer average-priced pub fare and brewery tours by appointment to those interested in seeing the inner workings of the operation. A visit to one of the Goose Island breweries is fun for those interested in trying some of their hard-to-find beers or those wanting a low-key outing.

I look forward to experiencing MPSA in April, and adding to my list of Chicago must-see attractions!

About the Author: Charmaine Willis is a current PhD Student at the Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy at the University at Albany, SUNY. Her current research interests are Northeast Asian regional dynamics; civil society development in non-Western contexts; and contentious politics with a specific focus on anti-US military base mobilization. Willis is also a blogger for the 2018 MPSA conference in Chicago. She can be reached at cwillis@albany.edu or on Twitter.

 

How Predictable is Your Work?

The truth about job security in the future

By Alex Ellison

 

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If you spend a lot of time doing predictable, physical work tasks in the accommodation and food services sector, you might want to diversify your skills and think about what transferable skills you have that could land you a new job in the next few years. Automation might get the better of you. On the other hand, if your work involves a good amount of managerial taskscreativity, novelty, expertise, or if you work in education, you’re probably in a good spot and you will likely have a fighting chance against the robots.

The interesting thing about automation, is that unlike the flu epidemic, which does not discriminate (especially this year), automation seems to discriminate based on the type of work you do. However, unlike some might assume, automation likely will not wipe out entire work sectors; rather, this imminent force will replace certain types of work tasks within a variety of sectors. In preparing for automation, we have to avoid blanket statements that name an entire sector as good or bad.

In the graph above, (another version of this graph can be found here), you can see that the accommodation and food services sector has a lot of people spending a lot of time doing predictable tasks. So it seems that it will be hard hit. However, experts and managers in that sector whose work is not predictable, meaning there are regularly new problems to solve and fires to put out daily, are pretty shielded from the threat of automation.

Look at education services. The bulk of the time spent in that sector is on tasks that involve expertise or management, meaning as a whole, that sector is pretty protected. A small amount of work in that sector is spent on manual labor, like data entry, and those job roles will likely be replaced by automation.

What does all of this mean for kids in school right now? What work will already be automated by the time they graduate high school or college? We ought to be preparing young people for the types of skills needed to be irreplacable; we ought to be preparing them for the unpredictable.


Alex Ellison is a college planner, education consultant, and co-founder at MENTEE. She will be a blogger at the Annual MPSA (Midwest Political Science Association) Conference in Chicago, IL. You can learn more about the conference and schedule here. Ellison will be attending Policies for Economically Vulnerable Populations and Making of Education Policy sessions. Read more from Alex Ellison on Medium

MPSA in 2017 – Accomplishments Worth Celebrating (video)

 

This year was confusing at times and exhausting at others, but it also had its high points. As we say goodbye to 2017, we welcome you to join us for the MPSA highlight reel. Our thanks to everyone who played a part in making these projects a reality, including our program chairs, council members, committee chairs, program partners, donors, volunteers, and members. May the new year welcome only the best to you both personally and professionally! – MPSA Staff

MPSA Roundtable on Congressional Leadership through the Eyes of Randy Strahan and Barbara Sinclair

MPSA Roundtable on Congressional Leadership through the Eyes of Randy Strahan and Barbara Sinclair

Sean M. Theriault of the University of Texas at Austin, chairs this MPSA roundtable session on “Congressional Leadership through the Eyes of Randy Strahan and Barbara Sinclair” with Gregory Koger, University of Miami, Daniel John Palazzolo, University of Richmond, Kathryn Pearson, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, David W. Rohde, Duke University and Matthew N. Green, Catholic University of America. Members of the panel remember the contributions of Randy Strahan and Barbara Sinclair to the field of political science through the sharing of memories and personal reflections and take an early look at congressional leadership in the 115th Congress.

Topics discussed include:

  • Reflections on the lives and careers of Randy Strahan and Barbara Sinclair and their contributions to the study of leadership in a representative body and to the field leadership studies overall.
  • Discussion of Barbara Sinclair’s influence and impact on congressional studies scholarship by women.
  • Recollection of the theoretical insights and perspectives these scholars brought to the study of congressional leadership.

MPSA members can log in to access a variety of recordings from highlighted MPSA conference presentations.

MPSA Blog: Top 10 Posts from 2016

MPSA Blog: Top 10 Posts from 2016

Regardless of your research interests, your academic (or Alt-Ac) role, or your aspirations for the new year, there is something on this list of MPSA’s most popular blog posts from 2016 that is sure to pique your interest:

MPSA would especially like to thank regular contributors Newly Paul, Adnan Rasool, Michael A. Smith, and Harry Young for sharing their research, political perspectives, and pedagogical insights with us this calendar year. We look forward to highlighting even more NSF-Funded research, conference presentations, and MPSA member interviews in the coming months. If you’re interested in sharing your work with MPSA’s members and the discipline, we’d love to hear from you.

Best wishes for a safe and productive 2017!

On the Eve of the 2017 Conference Season

On the Eve of Conference Season 2017

As the Fall semester comes to a close, most academics in our field are readying for the upcoming hectic conference schedule starting with SPSA in New Orleans in January, ISA (February) in Baltimore, MPSA (April) in Chicago, and ending with WPSA (April) in Vancouver. Keeping this in mind, this post discusses some decisions and challenges most of us face during this season. I start with some of the challenges my colleagues and I are facing right now.

First, as much as conferences are awesome, they require a lot of attention and effort on the part of participants and presenters. Attending conferences is an amazing learning experience for all of us, but the work that goes in to it can be overwhelming at times. For instance, I am presenting two pieces of work at SPSA and then I am scheduled to present at MPSA in April as well. That means I am working on finalizing three full-length conference-worthy papers within a space of effectively 3 months. And it is not just me, most of my colleagues are in the same boat. We submitted abstracts of some awesome ideas and now we have to hammer out solid papers to be presented at each of these conferences.

This has led to some interesting conversations I have had with other political scientists regarding how many projects and papers can be worked on simultaneously without forgoing quality. I agree with the conventional wisdom that you can only do so many conferences a year and if you do not have something solid to put out, it is better to sit one out and go back next year with something worthy instead of showing up with a half-baked idea. I feel we have all sat through those presentations where the idea is just not there yet and the presentation just makes the presenter look bad even if it could eventually pan out to be something excellent. The point I am making is – it is totally okay to focus on a few pieces of work and present at one or two conferences rather than try to show up with a not-so-great paper to every conference. That is why most of my colleagues and I are seriously deciding on whether to focus on one or two papers instead of doing quantity. Quality beats quantity every time in academia and it is worthwhile to have that discussion with yourself and your co-author.

Second, it is a worthwhile idea to have internal presentations before heading out to conferences. My grad school has a policy that requires every one who seeks travel funding to do internal presentations of their work before they head out. This helps the presenters hone in on their flaws and prepare for questions related to their research. Additionally, it helps the presenters realize where they stand with their research and whether it is ready to a point where they need to be putting it in front of the world. This is critical as at times because many of us can get too close to our own work to see its true quality.

Instead it is a worthwhile idea to take a step back and let your peers and colleagues judge your work in a grad school setting than a conference setting. Internal presentations have helped me personally pinpoint critical issues I was dwelling with my own research. In particular, I was satisfied with a paper I have been working on for most of the year, but it turns out I was rushing past the theoretical contributions of the research. The internal reviews and presentations helped me realize the mistakes I was making as my professors stepped in to pinpoint the exact issue I had to address. What really helped during these internal presentations was that I presented in front of an audience from different subfields. The benchmark was if an Americanist or a Theory person can fully understand my presentation on comparative authoritarianism, then it has merits. Otherwise I need to simplify and narrow my presentation so that everyone hearing it understands my contribution.

Finally, conference presentations are great but often those papers never seem to materialize in to publications. That is totally okay. Sometimes the first go on a paper sounds amazing but once you spend more time fleshing it out you realize it will never be as good as you want it to be. Instead of being stuck on it, just shelf it for a bit and move on. Sooner rather than later, that work will help you with a future project or paper and will be useful in creating something you can put out there as a publication.

So as Fall semester ends and holidays begin, I hope everyone ends up with great work that we can share in the next year. I will hopefully see y’all at SPSA. If not there, then MPSA for sure! Happy holidays! Merry Christmas! Happy Hanukah! And a Happy New Year!

About the Author: Adnan Rasool is a PhD Candidate & Student Innovation Fellow 2016 – 2017 at Georgia State University. He is also the recipient of the Taiwan Fellowship for 2017 by Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ROC. Adnan is a blogger for the 2017 MPSA conference in Chicago. His research work focuses on role of bureaucracies in democratization and populist clientalistic appeal in new democracies. You can also find Rasool on Twitter and his website

7 Keys to a Successful MPSA Proposal Submission

Editor’s Note: Since this blog post has been published, MPSA’s proposal deadline for papers, complete panels, and roundtables has been EXTENDED to Tuesday, October 18, 2016.


Knowing that political science scholars and students are deadline-driven, we anticipate that traffic to the MPSA website will increase as we approach the October 6, 2016 conference proposal deadline. If you intend to submit a proposal for the upcoming conference, this post is for you! The following tips will help you reduce stress as you face the upcoming proposal deadline:

Activate Your MPSA Account. Over the summer, we upgraded our website to integrate with an enhanced conference proposal submission system. The two systems will allow seamless access to your MPSA accounts and an easier conference proposal submission process, though this improvement requires each returning site user to create a new username and password. If you haven’t, we recommend taking a few moments today to activate your MPSA account. (Learn how to activate your existing account.)

Review this year’s Submission Guidelines. The MPSA Submission Guidelines have been revised to account for updates to our proposal management software. Please take a moment to review the new guidelines before submitting your proposal to avoid surprises.

Consider the best format for your research: Session formats for 2017 include (1) Panel, (2) Lightning Talk, (3) Poster, (4) Lecture, (5) Roundtable, (6) Junior Scholar Symposium, and (7) working group. Find more detail on the Session Formats and Role Descriptions page.

Choose (up to) two sections. In most cases, you may submit your proposal in up to two of over 80 sections. First year graduate students are only eligible to present in a poster or Lightning Talk format.

Write it out. We recommend that you write your overview and abstract in your favorite software before you log into the system, then copy and paste it into the text boxes.

Remember to keep it short. Be prepared to encounter these character limits (includes blank spaces and punctuation):

Title = Maximum 250 characters
Brief Overview = Maximum 250 characters
Abstracts = Maximum 1,250 characters

The new proposal system does not have a built-in word counter, so be sure to check in your word processing program or on an online site like Word Counter Tool.

Submit early and stress less. By preparing and submitting your proposal in advance of the deadline, you remove the potential for the self-imposed stress that can surround the hours before a deadline.

Once you receive confirmation of your submission, mark your calendar for important MPSA conference deadlines including the dates when notifications begin, scholarship and registration deadlines. Follow @MPSAnet and #MPSA17 on Twitter for the latest on the 75th annual conference.

If you have questions, just ask!  Please contact MPSA membership staff at mpsainfo@mpsanet.org with questions about account activation and MPSA conference staff at conf@mpsanet.org with your questions about the conference.